INTERVIEW: Brisbane outfit The Bonnie Doons

Can you talk to us more about your latest single “The Betweeners”?

Torian: “In this track we comment on toxic relationships and the fine line that falls between sensuality and fulfilment; coining the euphemism of being ‘stuck in between the sheets of love’.”

Torian came to me with an epic melody and chord progression which is now the chorus for the song – ‘Sweet, sensation when we’re stuck in between’. I put together some other basslines and riffs till we found a combo that we thought flowed, and we pretty much built the song around that chorus.

We kind of created a character and wrote from his perspective; he’s clearly been through a sticky situation with his ex, they’ve had some pretty gnarly fights, been to court, etc. But there’s still this lustful desire that keeps them coming back to each other, even to their own demise. And they remain stuck, ‘stuck in between the sheets of love’.

Did any event in particular inspire you to write this song?

No single event – but a combination of experiences we’ve both had, that helped tap into the perspective of the character. We exaggerated it for the purpose of the song. At least I think we did… Unless there’s something Torian hasn’t been telling me…

Any plans to release any sort of video for the track?

No real plans to. I mean, we could maybe do one early next year. I think the song does deserve it’s own video.

Why naming the album after this song in particular?

Firstly, we thought it had the coolest name of them all. Secondly, we thought it was probably the best hook. And lastly, the song is ultimately about being stuck in limbo because you’re too afraid to just commit to making a decision – something that almost everyone can relate to. The point being – we all need to make our decisions (sooner) and commit to them. Whether that be ending a toxic relationship, or something else.

How was the recording and writing process?

We roughly demoed the song in my room, like we do usually. Then Torian and I booked an Airbnb, ‘cabin in the woods’ style, to finish all the writing – lyrics wise. I produced and recorded it – the drums and rhythm guitars were done in Alchemix Studios in West End (Brisbane). Bass, lead guitars, and vocals were just done in my room. Then I sent all the stems over to Govinda for the mix.

What role does Brisbane play in your music?

Well it was in Brisbane that Torian and I first met; we’ve played a tonne of gigs here over the past few years and had some awesome experiences which ultimately led to us continuing the band when the old lead singer departed. So, I’d say, the role Brisbane played was mainly in fellowship.

How has Red Hot Chili Peppers and Bob Marley influenced your writing?

My sense of rhythm seems to be deeply connected to that of the peppers, I wouldn’t say I write lyrics at all similar to Kiedis’, but musically – the patterns I resort to – seem to have partly come from the Chili Peppers. Which would make sense, as I got heavily into them at a young age.

Bob Marley on the other hand, with such profound context behind his music and lyrics, plus everything he was about – both Torian and I found a deep connection to him and his art. I think it may have given us somewhat more of a story-tellers approach to writing.

Torian and I got a chance to catch The Wailers live in Brisbane a couple years ago – Bob Marley’s original band – and they were epic. Josh Barret (singer) crushed it, well they all did, but if you didn’t know any better, you’d almost think it was the man himself on the mic.

Where did you find the inspiration for the songs and lyrics?

The theme of this EP is to make better decisions; expressed mostly through talk of relationships. It’s important to evaluate your life every so often and make the decisions that are right for you, not to please others. If it’s the right thing to do, don’t avoid committing to a hard choice because you’re worried about how people will perceive it.

Ultimately it is about being truthful to yourself; to quit deceiving yourself because it’s easier at the time and having the confidence to stick to your guns. In a day where anxieties are prevalent everywhere, we’re trying to focus on making our actions more deliberate.

The Betweeners:

Torian:
In this track we comment on toxic relationships and the fine line that falls between sensuality and fulfilment; coining the euphemism of being ‘stuck in between the sheets of love’.

Kane:
We kind of created a character and wrote from his perspective; he’s clearly been through a sticky situation with his ex, they’ve had some pretty gnarly fights, been to court, etc. But there’s still this lustful desire that keeps them coming back to each other, even to their own demise. And they remain stuck, ‘stuck in between the sheets of love’.

Jiem:

Kane:
In this song we talk about physical attraction – how it can be easy to fall into the trap of infatuation, and that sometimes it’s best not to jump straight into the fun. It can be a kind of shallow pursuit if that’s the only pillar the relationship is founded on.

This one was originally a much longer, and different sounding song. Govinda accidentally sent a mix back to me with everything muted but the bass and vocals which gave me a totally new perspective on it. I kept the vocals and redid the music one afternoon in my room – just using the electronic drum kit and DI guitars / bass. This was what we call a happy accident. I think the EP needed a shorter, punchy one, anyway.

Supatool:

(a tool = a guy with a hugely over-inflated ego)

Torian:
Supatool was created back when we were first started experimenting with mixing Australian surf-rock with American funk-rap vibes, and it quickly proved to be one of our “supastrengths” (ha ha..). When Kane first showed me the riff, I instantly felt the emotion he was going for, so creating the lyrical vibe came naturally. 

It’s about a guy who is a bit promiscuous in his approach to relationships and thinks highly of himself for doing so, hurting some feelings along the way. In the end he finds someone who completely changes his perspective, though she ends up breaking his heart.

Kane:
The basis of this song begun when I was jamming it with a friend (shoutout Oscar Pannifex) down in the garage at one of my old places. I had this toolbox sitting in the corner which was branded ‘Supatool’ and so I used that word on the spot when coming up with some melodies. Ended up sticking haha, and it gave us an idea for something to write about.

Fred:

Torian:
In this track we talk about staying true to who you are and not letting your emotional attachments to things or people keep you from doing what’s right for you. Breaking down the barriers of guilt, letting something go and moving on – that’s what this song is about.

Kane:

I came up with the music for this track years ago, back in late 2016. Put it on the back burner until I rediscovered it again after the band was established. I always thought it would sound cool with a rap over it, funnily enough I met Torian not long after making it.

What else is happening next in The Bonnie Doons’ world?

We’ll be playing shows in January to launch this EP – hopefully nothing prevents us from doing that, covid wise. Otherwise, we’ve got plenty of music ready to move on with. It’s all a bit different to this EP and the last, so just deciding on which songs we’ll release next. Likely to come out as another EP, to maybe bridge us to our first album.

CONNECT WITH THE BONNIE DOONS

FACEBOOK | INSTAGRAM | SPOTIFY | APPLE MUSIC | YOUTUBE

About RJ Frometa

Head Honcho, Editor in Chief and writer here on VENTS. I don't like walking on the beach, but I love playing the guitar and geeking out about music. I am also a movie maniac and 6 hours sleeper.

Check Also

INTERVIEW: Fuzz Skyler

Hi guys, welcome to VENTS! How have you been? Thanks for having us! We’re good …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.