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INTERVIEW: The Bingers

Hi guys, welcome to VENTS! How have you been?

Thank you! Doing well!

Can you talk to us more about your single “Simone”?

Simone is a popper through and through. I wrote it a few years back. We were never really sure if we wanted to use it as a song. We would jam it sometimes but never really planned for anything more than that. I always imagined a falsetto vocal melody on it, maybe that is why we never really saw it fitting with other stuff we were doing. When we were recording we decided to lay it down and we got that falsetto track. It was weird, not gonna lie, but seemed to fit right.

Did any event in particular inspired you to write this song?

Oh yeah, Simone was written for our old alley cat. We all lived together in a house in Logan Square for a few years. There was this loveable black cat that would always come over and just hang on our porch, or if a door was ever open it would just make its way inside. We would feed her turkey and let her hang with us and then she would make her way back to the outdoors. We ended up naming her Simone cause she needed a name. Turned out it was a neighbors outdoor cat that was in fact a male named Sylvester. Either way, she was great and always a pleasure to see. So, I guess the song is an ode to her. Its tough out there in Logan for an alley cat, and she held her own. Actually talked to an old neighbor and she is still kickin’!

Any plans to release a video for the single?

We have a video in the works!

The single comes off your new album Stay Satisfied – what’s the story behind the title?

Jackie wrote a tune for this album called Stay Satisfied which was gonna be the title track but we cut it and figured we’d use it for the next album. The name seemed to fit in these times though, so we kept it for this album title. Basically, there is so much bullshit, always, and a lot of times it’s hard to deal. It’s important to remember to take time out for ourselves whatever that may mean. Center yourself, regain some balance and keep on keeping on,  just try to stay satisfied.

How was the recording and writing process?

It was a lot of fun. Teddy and I live in a two flat together so we all practice and record in our basement. It’s great to be able to do that stuff at home, it just makes the whole vibe of things more chill. We all write and are always bringing stuff to the table but this batch of songs was a very cohesive writing process. A lot of just jamming and working things out on the spot together. Having three different song writers can be tricky sometimes, everyone has their own unique style which is awesome and keeps things fresh but sometimes hard to not have things be too eclectic. I think the time spent hashing things out, working on stuff together really helped in making these songs flow.

Why did you choose to record this on analog?

We recorded our earlier EPs digitally using logic and pro tools, and we’re still happy with how they turned out, but the process is different with analog equipment.  On a reel to reel, the tracks slightly bleed together – it makes for a more cohesive, live feel.  There’s also natural tape compression going on that helps it sound good even before you start mixing or adding any effects. Adding to that, because tape can be temperamental and wear out – you’re working within restrictions. You’ve got eight tracks.  You can’t cut and paste a hundred times until something is squeaky clean. It forces you to think first, play as best as you can, and then accept the results.  Lots of tracks on this are what we like to call “one take jakes” – for better or worse.  Some parts were actually improvised after hitting “record.”  And then there’s that moment where you’re like “can this be better?” and of course it can.  But what’s “better?”  Especially within the style of music we make – sometimes the fuckups are what give it character. I don’t think analog is better than digital by default, but for a simple rock and roll band, it kind of forces you to engage with the process a little more- get the whole band around a microphone – that’s what we wanted to do. 

What role does Chicago play on this album?

Chicago has always played a huge roll for us in all our songs. Living here gives you a certain type of grit that you should be proud of. Dealing with long bull shit winters just to finally get a couple months of summer. A lot of angry people, the terrible traffic, the city’s expenses/corruption, all of these things can really get to you. The good always seems to outweigh the bad though. You kinda feel better for dealing with it and making it out alive. And that seems to be some kind of creative fuel here. We came up in a crop of good rocknroll bands. So many good bands. It keeps you on your toes.

Where did you find the inspiration for the songs and lyrics?

I’d say mostly just life and livin’. Lyrics are really important to all of us. We’d rather say something than nothing. That being said, it’s also fun to get creative with what you say. You don’t always have to say exactly what you mean, we try to play around with creativity and different ways to tell a story or convey how/what we’re feeling. I said earlier we are all 3 song writers. It’s cool to let that play out and help each other out when we can. All three of us could write about the same thing but we’d each express ourselves differently. It keeps things fresh and ideas flowing. There’s been numerous times where something Jack or Teddy writes inspires me to write something completely new based on that.

Any plans to hit the road?  

Planning a quick tour east in the next couple months – but between our work and personal lives, we haven’t seen a way to escape for months at a time. We know with a band like this we’re not gonna be big pop stars, so we do what we can.  Sometimes we think it’d be great to do this full time, but then you’re kinda swapping one grind for another. We like that music is our release.

What else is happening next in The Bingers’ world?

When we recorded Stay Satisfied we ended up with 18 tracks, so we have a bunch of material we didn’t end up using. So we’re gonna work on expanding that and getting it to your ears.

Listen here

About RJ Frometa

Head Honcho, Editor in Chief and writer here on VENTS. I don't like walking on the beach, play guitar, music geek, movie maniac and 6 hours sleeper.

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